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show
/ FEU; Fo/ n 1 [C] any type of public entertainment, eg a circus, a theatre performance, or a radio or TV programme ; ; : a TV quiz show * a comedy show on radio * She has her own chat show. . * The most successful shows in the London theatre are often musicals. . 2 [C] public display or exhibition, eg of things in a competition, new products, etc ; : a flower, horse, cattle show * the motor show, ie where new models of cars, etc are displayed * the Lord Mayor's Show, ie a procession through the streets of London when a new Mayoris appointed . =>Usage at demonstration demonstration. 3 [C, U] (a) thing done to give a certain impression, often a false one; outward appearance ; : a show of defiance, strength, friendship, sympathy * His public expressions of grief are nothing but show. . (b) splendid or pompous display ; : a fine show of blossom on the apple trees * all the glitter and show of the circus * They are too fond of show, ie too ostentatious. . 4 [C usu sing ] (Brit infml ) thing done or performed in a specified way : a poor show, ie sth done badly * put up a good show, eg do well in examinations or a contest . 5 [C] (infml ) anything that is happening; organization, business or undertaking ; ; ; : She runs the whole show. . * Let's get this show moving, ie start work. . * This is the manager's show: you must ask him about it. : . 6 (idm ) for `show intended to be seen but not used : She only has those books for show she never reads them. --. ,good `show! (Brit infml ) (used to express approval or congratulation when sth has been done well ): You passed your exams? Good show! ? ! on `show being displayed ; : All the new products were on show at the exhibition. . a show of `hands raising of hands by a group of people to vote for or against sth : The issue was decided by a show of hands. . * Who is in favour of the proposal? Can I have a show of hands, please? ? ? steal the scene/show =>steal. stop the show =>stop1.
OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY posted at 2009/11/22 13:42:22
§ Mothers Day § crusher § put sth towards sth § christmas § xmas §

Better Explanations about "show"

show
/ FEU; Fo/ v (pt showed, pp shown / FEUn; Fon/ or, rarely, showed) 1 (a) [Tn, Cn.a, Cn.g, Dn.n, Dn.pr] ~ sb/sth (to sb) cause sb/sth to be seen; display sb/sth []; []: You must show your ticket at the barrier. . * The film is being shown at the local cinema. . * Her paintings are being shown (ie exhibited) at a gallery in London. . * The photo shows her dressed in black. , . * In the portrait he is shown lying on a sofa. . * He showed me his pictures. . * She has shown them to all her friends. . (b) [Tn, Tf, Tw] allow (sth) to be seen; reveal ; : A dark suit doesn't show the dirt so much. . * My shoes are showing signs of wear. . 2 [I, Ipr, Ip] be visible or noticeable ; : Your petticoat is showing, Jane. , . * Does the scar still show? ? * His fear showed in his eyes. . * Her laziness showed in her exam results. . * His shirt was so thin that his vest showed through (it). , . 3 [Tn no passive , Dn.n, Dn.w] point (sth) out; indicate ; ; : The clock shows half past two. . * Show me which picture you drew. . 4 [Tn no passive ] (a) ~ itself be visible ; : His annoyance showed itself in his face. . * The sun didn't show itself all day. . (b) ~ oneself be present; appear ; : He showed himself briefly at the party. . * The leader rarely shows herself in public. . 5 [Tn, Dn.n, Dn.pr] treat (sb) with (kindness, respect, cruelty, etc); give; grant ; ; : The king often shows mercy (to prisoners). . * The priest showed me great understanding. . * They showed nothing but contempt for him. . 6 [Tn, Cn.a, Cn.n no passive ] give evidence or proof of being or having (sth) : show no signs of intelligence * a soldier who showed great courage/showed himself to be very brave * She showed herself unable to deal with money. . * He showed himself (to be) a dishonest rascal. . 7 [Tn, Tf, Tw, Tnt, Dn.n, Dn.pr, Dn.f, Dn.w] ~sth (to sb) make sth clear; demonstrate sth; prove sth ; : show the falseness of her claims/that her claims are false * show (him) how to do it/what to do [] * His expression shows how unhappy he is. . * Her new book shows her to be a first-rate novelist. . * They were shown the tragedy of war. . * She showed her methods of analysis to her pupils. . 8 [Tn.pr, Tn.p] lead or conduct (sb) to the specified place or in the specified direction ; ; : We were shown into the waiting-room. . * Please show this lady out (of the building). . * The usherette showed us to our seats. . * Our trained guides will show you round (the museum). . 9 [Tn no passive ] (infml ) prove one's ability or worth to (sb) : They think I can't win, but I'll show them. , . 10 (sl esp US) appear; show up ; : I waited for you all morning but you never showed. , . 11 [I] (US) win a place (third or better) in a horse race . 12 (idm ) do/show sb a kindness =>kindness (kind1). fly/show/wave the flag =>flag1. go to `show serve to prove or demonstrate : You've got no money now. It all/only goes to show you shouldn't gamble. , . show (sb) a clean pair of `heels (infml often joc , ) run away ; . show sb the `door ask sb to leave ; : After having insulted his host, he was shown the door. , . show one's `face appear before people : She daren't show her face in the street. . show one's `hand/`cards reveal one's intentions or plans : I suspect they're planning something but they haven't shown their hand yet. , . show sb/know/learn the ropes =>rope. show a `leg (infml joc , ) get out of bed . show one's teeth use one's power or authority to intimidate or punish sb . show (sb) the `way (a) tell sb how to get to a certain place : show him the way to the station . (b) be an example to sb : Let's hope her bravery will show the way for other young people. . show the white `feather act in a cowardly way; show fear ; . show `willing show that one is ready to do sth, eg work hard, help, etc : I don't think I'm needed as a helper, but I'll go anyway, just to show willing. , , . (have) something, nothing, etc to show for sth (have) something, nothing, etc as a result of sth : All those years of hard work, and nothing to show for it! , . * I've only got 100 to show for all the stuff I sold. , 100. 13 (phr v) show off (infml often derog , ) try to impress others with one's abilities, wealth, intelligence, etc : Do stop showing off it's embarrassing. --. * The child danced around the room, showing off to everybody. , . show sb/sth off draw people's attention to sb/sth []: a dress that shows off her figure well * She was showing off her new husband at the party. . * He likes showing off how well he speaks French. . show up (infml ) arrive, often after a delay; appear ; : It was ten o'clock when he finally showed up. . * We were hoping for a full team today but only five players showed up. , . show (sth) up (cause sth to) become visible : The dust on the shelf shows up in the sunlight. . * Close inspection shows up the cracks in the stonework. . show sb up (infml ) make sb feel embarrassed by behaving badly in his company : He showed me up by falling asleep at the concert. , . show sb up (as/for sth/to be sth) show sb to be (dishonest, disreputable, etc) : His diary shows him up as/shows him up to have been a greedy, arrogant man. .
OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY posted at 2009/11/22 13:42:22
show
/ FEU; Fo/ v (pt showed, pp shown / FEUn; Fon/ or, rarely, showed) 1 (a) [Tn, Cn.a, Cn.g, Dn.n, Dn.pr] ~ sb/sth (to sb) cause sb/sth to be seen; display sb/sth []; []: You must show your ticket at the barrier. . * The film is being shown at the local cinema. . * Her paintings are being shown (ie exhibited) at a gallery in London. . * The photo shows her dressed in black. , . * In the portrait he is shown lying on a sofa. . * He showed me his pictures. . * She has shown them to all her friends. . (b) [Tn, Tf, Tw] allow (sth) to be seen; reveal ; : A dark suit doesn't show the dirt so much. . * My shoes are showing signs of wear. . 2 [I, Ipr, Ip] be visible or noticeable ; : Your petticoat is showing, Jane. , . * Does the scar still show? ? * His fear showed in his eyes. . * Her laziness showed in her exam results. . * His shirt was so thin that his vest showed through (it). , . 3 [Tn no passive , Dn.n, Dn.w] point (sth) out; indicate ; ; : The clock shows half past two. . * Show me which picture you drew. . 4 [Tn no passive ] (a) ~ itself be visible ; : His annoyance showed itself in his face. . * The sun didn't show itself all day. . (b) ~ oneself be present; appear ; : He showed himself briefly at the party. . * The leader rarely shows herself in public. . 5 [Tn, Dn.n, Dn.pr] treat (sb) with (kindness, respect, cruelty, etc); give; grant ; ; : The king often shows mercy (to prisoners). . * The priest showed me great understanding. . * They showed nothing but contempt for him. . 6 [Tn, Cn.a, Cn.n no passive ] give evidence or proof of being or having (sth) : show no signs of intelligence * a soldier who showed great courage/showed himself to be very brave * She showed herself unable to deal with money. . * He showed himself (to be) a dishonest rascal. . 7 [Tn, Tf, Tw, Tnt, Dn.n, Dn.pr, Dn.f, Dn.w] ~sth (to sb) make sth clear; demonstrate sth; prove sth ; : show the falseness of her claims/that her claims are false * show (him) how to do it/what to do [] * His expression shows how unhappy he is. . * Her new book shows her to be a first-rate novelist. . * They were shown the tragedy of war. . * She showed her methods of analysis to her pupils. . 8 [Tn.pr, Tn.p] lead or conduct (sb) to the specified place or in the specified direction ; ; : We were shown into the waiting-room. . * Please show this lady out (of the building). . * The usherette showed us to our seats. . * Our trained guides will show you round (the museum). . 9 [Tn no passive ] (infml ) prove one's ability or worth to (sb) : They think I can't win, but I'll show them. , . 10 (sl esp US) appear; show up ; : I waited for you all morning but you never showed. , . 11 [I] (US) win a place (third or better) in a horse race . 12 (idm ) do/show sb a kindness =>kindness (kind1). fly/show/wave the flag =>flag1. go to `show serve to prove or demonstrate : You've got no money now. It all/only goes to show you shouldn't gamble. , . show (sb) a clean pair of `heels (infml often joc , ) run away ; . show sb the `door ask sb to leave ; : After having insulted his host, he was shown the door. , . show one's `face appear before people : She daren't show her face in the street. . show one's `hand/`cards reveal one's intentions or plans : I suspect they're planning something but they haven't shown their hand yet. , . show sb/know/learn the ropes =>rope. show a `leg (infml joc , ) get out of bed . show one's teeth use one's power or authority to intimidate or punish sb . show (sb) the `way (a) tell sb how to get to a certain place : show him the way to the station . (b) be an example to sb : Let's hope her bravery will show the way for other young people. . show the white `feather act in a cowardly way; show fear ; . show `willing show that one is ready to do sth, eg work hard, help, etc : I don't think I'm needed as a helper, but I'll go anyway, just to show willing. , , . (have) something, nothing, etc to show for sth (have) something, nothing, etc as a result of sth : All those years of hard work, and nothing to show for it! , . * I've only got 100 to show for all the stuff I sold. , 100. 13 (phr v) show off (infml often derog , ) try to impress others with one's abilities, wealth, intelligence, etc : Do stop showing off it's embarrassing. --. * The child danced around the room, showing off to everybody. , . show sb/sth off draw people's attention to sb/sth []: a dress that shows off her figure well * She was showing off her new husband at the party. . * He likes showing off how well he speaks French. . show up (infml ) arrive, often after a delay; appear ; : It was ten o'clock when he finally showed up. . * We were hoping for a full team today but only five players showed up. , . show (sth) up (cause sth to) become visible : The dust on the shelf shows up in the sunlight. . * Close inspection shows up the cracks in the stonework. . show sb up (infml ) make sb feel embarrassed by behaving badly in his company : He showed me up by falling asleep at the concert. , . show sb up (as/for sth/to be sth) show sb to be (dishonest, disreputable, etc) : His diary shows him up as/shows him up to have been a greedy, arrogant man. .
OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY posted at 2009/11/22 13:42:22

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